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Psychical Point to Point
IN THIS SECTION   point to pitch     point to point     Notes 2020/05/10 Psychology Today 2015 Article and further clarification on Point to Point Point to Point  Point Behind a Point or Fixation of a Point See also Point To Pitch This concept relates to attention, distractions and energy drawing.  The idea is that a remote influencing perpetrator with advanced psychic and energy knowledge will manipulate a person’s attention and energy toward a point behind a more obvious object.  In other words, the illusion is in the first point which acts like a trap for the hidden second point.  The perpetrator has a clear ideas of what the goal is.  In some cases the goal is to be the boss.  So let’s say as an example we use the first point as Jesus.  The second point behind Jesus, which in this case is a distraction and a placard, is a bull’s eye which collects the person’s attention and energy.  Look at the bull’s eye as a collection site for the energy.  Now let’s use the example that the people using the Jesus mirage are Muslims.  It could just as well be Zionists, or a certain ancient strain of East Indian adepts, , the British Crown, Catholics, Black/Hispanic Occultists or Satanists.  In the zone of influence, see a web of distractions, including keeping th body and emotions unbalanced and unable to focus right.  The perpetrators feed the masses fast food with low nutritional value, high levels of salt and sugar and with the meat pumped with hormones; dope, beer and anti-depressants to keep them down; and coffee or high energy drinks to keep then spazzed.  They downgrade cities with gambling, drug dealers and hard conditions for basic survival.   In the midst of this low energy framework, the masses are more pliable for ready-made, quickly digestible solutions that resemble real religion: they promote the Jesus Saves myth and anti-abortion signs as the first point; behind that point, however, the fake manipulators control the ensemble of Christian sign makers, high cost churches, Christian booksellers, and many forms of Christian propaganda.  If you look carefully with sincerity in your heart, you will find the buzz behind the business in religion.  In other words, the same people who make the business products in other operations like also control what Christians buy - and more importantly, what they think about buying.  As they manipulate a fixation on the first level point of a buzz-trapped Jesus image, they send energy to the point behind that visible point - to an energy and money-absorbing bull’s eye.  For sincere Christians, this is an irritating and insulting example.  But stay clear in your mind.  What we are getting at here is not the Jesus issue per se; we are trying to awaken you to the idea that crafty people can use any image and idea on the planet, even the most spiritual and sacred seeming ones,  to create artificial first level visual or idea-based points to gather energy toward a second level hidden receptor.  People can control other people’s religious icons to draw the energy toward obedience to a leader and the state.  It can shift deferment to a religious authority from the first point to the second point, the second point being a totalitarian government or a corporate-religious entity.  This might be called tenderizing the meat, or softening the dough.  It helps make people malleable for apparent good reasons, but when the screen is pulled, what lies behind is The Wizard.   It ripens people for obedience to a false object.  They use people’s fear, sadness or desire for some kind of magic pill for better economics - religion can seem like a way to push off the Devil or to gain God’s favor  - in this format.  The people in the wizard’s box are playing on people’s emotions to compartmentalize religion into packaged steps that seem to promise “The Way.”   Watch carefully where the money goes and how it is manipulated, and this is one way to find the shadow box, but there are other ways.  Canned ideas and channeling people’s thoughts in certain directions are other ways.  There is also a kind of buzz or plastic feeling about the whole thing that people inside don’t seem to recognize; when you are outside of it looking in, it is easier to sense such things.  People already trapped might not have that objectivity because they have learned to ignore the warning signs and now are immune to certain forms of self-evaluation. Point to Pitch Controlled Focus Points: Bringing an idea or emotion to a certain tonal level This is in connection with a point behind a point but refers to taking the gathered, focused or collected point to a certain energetic and/or total pitch (comparable to a tonal quality) which can include a concept, like The Crown or Russia the Motherland. So taking the idea and feeling of Jesus, say, to the feeling of loyalty to The Crown which can include tithes, taxes and purchases of products.  Everything is to connect with a royalty/loyalty/religious unity.  It can go back to a time when political leaders were seen as endowed with godly characteristics or midway men between God and subjects.  There are antecedents that go back to the times of Babylon and before.  It is a way to not only draw in attention but to keep it contained within a certain frequency of feeling and thought. Religion and the Battle of Wills 2015 Psychology Today article Fundamentalist Christianity and Child Abuse: A Taboo Topic More added to No Honor, No Country section Religion can come at us in a hypnotically repetitious manner through induced brainwave shifts and psychological driving.  Although the article from Psychology Today does not discuss hypnagogic driving, one side effect of repeated messaging to self and others can be mental programming.  Religious thinking does not occur in a vacuum, and can be about what we focus on, where our attention goes. As many of you realize by following advice to diligently read the Spiritual Disclosures and accompanying Religious Abuse sections (Dominionism, Mormon, Catholic, Protestant Sexual Abuse) on River Gold (the accompanying alter ego and Cons Piracy website to Police Factor) I feel strongly that religious fundamentalism of any kind, when taken too far, can wind up in an abusive space on its way to a violent, and thus ultimately criminalistic, one. I grew up in a community that can be likened to the Deep South in terms of religious fundamentalism.  However, having dealt with several southern religionists over the course of my life, I would say it has a harsher atmosphere. There is often a rough and tumble, emotionally detached approach to religion in this area in contrast to the comparative family and neighborly oriented warmth that often found in many parts of the South.  Adherents in San Juan County support each other, to be sure, but they tend to want to proselytize  at the expense of developing connections with non-believers.  People who are less religiously oriented also can have that cold bubble of fear, non-trust and disinterest in this area. I have often pondered why the San Juan County portion of the Four Corners has this problem.  Instead of getting better, the community still has its thorny side.  The approach creates cliques and the ostracizing of people who are different.  The ostracizing is often done to boss, control and refrain from helping someone.  Coming from religionists, it’s often about abstaining from emotional and other support until a non-believer finally gets it - usually Jesus or Mormonism - and submits.  People will open doors if you come to church, but otherwise leave others hanging out alone to wither on the vine, if necessary.  They often as churches offer charity, but frequently it is part of a proselytizing venture.  Some of the largest churches continue to look and operate like large corporations, complete with advertising gimmicks such as football banners next to church signs and bumper stickers. The tendency to withhold services or fair play can go hand in hand with the high rate of drugs and alcohol in the region and state, with everyone fearful of being a codependent or waiting for someone to bottom out before they will help.  Coupled with religious fears of Satan, the tendency for an emotionally detached approach becomes a widespread cultural problem. Even if someone is not a substance abuser, they can get lumped in with those who are if their actions seem even slightly off base or out of the ordinary.  Labels catch on like wildfire.  To explain things they don’t understand or to wipe off someone they don’t like from the charts, the networked cliques  might latch on to a rumor of something like manic-depressive.  Once people have a label in hand for someone they know,  they feel they are off the hook from further real thought or discussion about that person.  They hear the person’s name, they immediately link it to the label.  Sometimes these labels stick for decades because grandparents pass on the gossip to their kids and grandkids.  Anyone who has been the victim of religious fundamentalism cliques in small cities or towns knows how difficult it can be if you are different from the crowd.  The people can sense you are different almost immediately, for one thing.  It’s in how you dress, think, speak, hold your body and walk. If you are a woman, in some cases it’s whether you wear makeup or not, do or don’t do your hair, how you wear your purse. For men, it’s if you have the wrong kind of swagger or seem to smile too much or seem too touchy-feely.  So they often make either subconscious or conscious opinions from these things; they might decide as a woman you are too masculine or egalitarian; they also might conclude you are more educated than the general lot they hang out with, so you might be uppity, or you might have money.  If they feel you are uppity and have money, they might try to trick you or steal from you.  The antics can include overcharging you, yet even when they are getting more money from you than they would have from the average man off the streets, they might try to sneak something around you to their advantage.  With mechanics or plumbers it can happen where you cannot see them working on something of yours, like a car or a heater/air condition high up on a roof.  With cars, sometimes they are stealing or swapping parts, like taking your newer parts and putting them in some other car, or putting in used or ultra-cheap parts and charging you for quality parts.  Sometimes they don’t do anything real or useful on your car and they charge you a large amount; sometimes they misdiagnose for a high rate of pay.  Sometimes plumbers think you live alone and are an easy take.  This behavior can be defiance as much as anything. One of the reasons San Juan County, New Mexico has a problem with religion across various sects is that people intermarry and ideas spread between churches.  Another is that a major industry, oil and gas, interconnects people across all religions.  Yet another is that political leadership mirrors the populace.  When they are fundamentalists, it gets into the very air people breathe - you can’t escape it even if you close your doors and do your own thing in your own home.  For one thing, it’s the shared visual domain:  large crosses on hills and anti-abortion signs on almost every street corner in certain high traffic pockets of town.  What happens to people in the fundamentalist mode is ego.  People get inside their heads.  They become stubborn and defiant,  calling that part of their own will God.  They might sense energy - form of collective bioenergy - in their churches and get overly excited about it, thinking Wow!  In one sense, Ego + Energy = God.  People, inside their heads,  convince themselves they have something special that others do not have.  They feel they need to go around sharing it to get other people to find the good news and be saved.   Coupled with literature and clerics, the idea is to missionize and convert.  The pulse to convert gets passed down from generation to generation.  Many different religious groups have that conversion pulse and the principle associated with a believers versus non-believers dichotomy. As members of the public refute their religionist tendencies and advances, their egos kick in further.  They do what their families, ministers or priests tell them.   The ego and mind tells them that if non-believers give them flack, they are to hold firm in their ways and beliefs, because it is Satan and the banality of the lower world that does that.  There are defense mechanisms to keep them from listening to others.  By bearing down in this way, they do not let in new ideas.  They wall up and call it godly fortitude. On River Gold, I suggested a way to think about this as Point to Point and Point to Pitch.  I realize these concepts can be a little out there for some.  Some of you got it on the get go, others were left with head-scratching: “Huh?” The point I was making (no pun intended) is that ideas and their correlated energies can be thought of as the tips of a laser beam.  The laser creates a dot of light on a surface like a black piece of paper.  You can imagine your brain’s workings are the energy behind the light dot.  When the laser has special capabilities which can switch the basic beam to lower or higher ones, or even flashing or multi-colored ones, that then is Pitch.  This is a modulated modality. The laser shifts from Point (dot) to Pitch (colors, flashes, high, low) mode by different energy applications inside the laser (our brain).  Points are directed focal spots.  It’s where our attention is drawn and held.  Pitch is the span and intensity under control; it’s the qualified modality of our attention.  Pitch is how far we are allowed to think and operate given a set of precepts.  Pitch is the maneuvering room of our boxes; it’s how far we can stretch our wings. Taking this further, the Point is the basic tenets of a belief system.  It’s the rules of the religion.  The Pitch part is the set of delimiters.  If you imagine a scale from 1 to 10, pitch in this scenario means 4-6.  It means you cannot go too far to the left or right of your basic point.  Your pitch is set to a certain limit. This means religious fundamentalists have certain ideas that have built-in delimiters.  This means cultural and text rules tell them how far they can do things, how far they can think before they have gone too far. Frequently pitch is set by beliefs in Heaven and Hell, a divided realm between God and Satan, with the confusing notion that ultimately all things are God.  Built into the argument immediately is a paradox: how you can battle part of yourself, or existence?  If everything is God, and ultimately Satan is God’s, and of God, then how can you fight that? Because of this dilemma, this paradox, the ego has to set in; the voice of the ego gets louder and louder to shut off those and other disturbing, conflicted notions.  The pitch of the voice might be thought of as a function of the delimiters of expressed pitch.  For every nth of reduced mobility, potentiality or permitted expression, there is an nth increase in contentious, defiant, God aggrandizing voice volume.  What this means is that people lose track of the more spiritual aspects of religion by focusing on small things like dots and points, while losing sight of the bigger things, like the forest, symphony or quality of life. More than once, I have heard shrill tones from women and men toward their children and the radio or TV  pulpit’s listening audience.  The shrill voices decry Satan and divide us from them - the non-believers.  The tones are often flat and hollow sounding, or they are manipulative in their theatrics.  Some people listen to the radio or their Christian CD’s constantly, constantly taking that into their heads and emotions.  It comes on when they get in the car.  Some people play the gospel stations at work if they own the business or have that control. It goes on and on and on…Satan this, Satan that, the works of God look like THIS, the words of the devil look like THAT; true salvation comes to those who believe the true word of the Gospel…and so it goes, day after day, month after month, year after year… It’s as spell-binding and any Islamic fundamentalism, because it includes the aspect of constant repetition and the exclusion of other ideas. Here is an excellent article from Psychology Today which I will excerpt in full, but I will start with the finale of it and then add the earlier material he presents as an exemplifying backup to the concept.  His finale - his conclusions - are the most important thing for fundamentalists to walk away with.   The other material serves as real world examples. Psychology Today 2015/11/19  Fundamentalist Christianity and Child Abuse: A Taboo Topic.  A former fundamentalist minister speaks out.  By David N. Elkins Ph.D. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-human-dimension/201511/fundamentalist-christianity-and-child- abuse-taboo-topic Excerpt: Finale and Conclusions For me, growing up in a fundamentalist religion was not all bad. I believe most fundamentalist Christians are loving, kind, and well-intentioned. But fundamentalist religion has a way of causing even good people to believe and do bad things. Our children need and deserve the best we can give them. Fundamentalist religion can damage their minds, emotions, and souls. Parents in fundamentalist religions should examine their religious beliefs and think deeply about what they are doing to their children. A good friend of mine says, "If your religion causes you to do bad things, then you should reexamine your religion." I am 70 years old. I grew up in a fundamentalist church, attended a fundamentalist college, and became a fundamentalist minister. My parents were very loving. My ministers were good, kind men. My professors were sincere and compassionate. The problem was their fundamentalist religion. I was taught that women were second class citizens, that homosexuality was an abomination to God, that members of other world religions were going to hell because they were not Christians. My church taught that God loved me, but I was afraid of him.  As a child, I was so afraid of going to hell that I became depressed when I was 12. While my friends were outside playing that summer, I stayed in my room, overwhelmed by worry about my eternal salvation. Even later, after I became a minister, my biggest fear was that I might think, say, or do something that would cause me to go to hell.  Today, when people ask me if I believe in hell, I say, "Yes. I was there for several years." Bulk of Article with Finale and Conclusions left intact at end as originally written  An American child is dying at home. The parents are members of a Christian sect that does not believe in modern medicine. They pray fervently but the child grows worse and dies. "It was God's will," says the father. The mother agrees. A 5-year-old boy said a dirty word. His Christian father spanks him with a wooden paddle. The paddle leaves welts and bruises. "Spare the rod and spoil the child," says the father, quoting the Bible. Jimmy is bright and sensitive. He loves to go to church and sit in the front pew with the other kids. One Sunday morning, the preacher talks about hell. He says, "Sinners will burn forever in the fires of hell." On the way home from church, Jimmy asks his parents, "What's a sinner?" His mother says, "It's a person who does bad things." His father adds, "It's also people who don't believe in Jesus."  Jimmy asks, "Will they really burn forever in hell?" His father says, "Yes, that's what the Bible says." Jimmy is only eight years old. From then on, his biggest worry will be that he might go to hell and burn forever. Kristy is eight. Her father leads the congregational singing at church. "When I get big, I want to lead the singing just like Daddy," Kristy says. Her mother tells her, "You can serve God in many ways but only men can lead the singing." Kristy says, "Why?" Her mother says, "Because God doesn't want women to usurp the authority of men." Kristy says, "Oh, I didn't know that." Mary is 15. She's gay. She wants to date other girls but knows her church would not approve. Her pastor seems like a kind man, so she talks to him about her dilemma. He listens and then says, "Mary, I'm your pastor and must tell you the truth: homosexuality is an abomination and you must never give in to those impulses." Mary doesn't know what to do. She feels hopeless. She falls into a deep depression. Four months later, she kills herself.  I am 70 years old. I grew up in a fundamentalist church, attended a fundamentalist college, and became a fundamentalist minister. My parents were very loving. My ministers were good, kind men. My professors were sincere and compassionate. The problem was their fundamentalist religion. I was taught that women were second class citizens, that homosexuality was an abomination to God, that members of other world religions were going to hell because they were not Christians. My church taught that God loved me, but I was afraid of him.  s a child, I was so afraid of going to hell that I became depressed when I was 12. While my friends were outside playing that summer, I stayed in my room, overwhelmed by worry about my eternal salvation. Even later, after I became a minister, my biggest fear was that I might think, say, or do something that would cause me to go to hell.  Today, when people ask me if I believe in hell, I say, "Yes. I was there for several years." I left the ministry and church years ago. My life since then has not a bed of roses. I miss the relationships. I miss the respect of my family, most of whom are still members of that fundamentalist church. I miss the security of thinking that I had everything figured out. I do not miss the fundamentalist doctrines that made women second class citizens, that told me gays and lesbians were going to hell, that caused me so much anxiety and depression as a child, that hung over me like a dark cloud even as a minister in my 20s. For me, growing up in a fundamentalist religion was not all bad. I believe most fundamentalist Christians are loving, kind, and well-intentioned. But fundamentalist religion has a way of causing even good people to believe and do bad things. Our children need and deserve the best we can give them. Fundamentalist religion can damage their minds, emotions, and souls. Parents in fundamentalist religions should examine their religious beliefs and think deeply about what they are doing to their children. A good friend of mine says, "If your religion causes you to do bad things, then you should reexamine your relig